Military Communications & COTS 2009-2019

Military Communications & COTS 2009-2019: A Market in Retreat?

Publication date: 19-03-09
Number of pages in report: 210

Pricing:


Adoption of new commercially-available platforms and technologies has fuelled a global military communications industry worth more than $15bn per annum. Prime beneficiaries of this trend have included suppliers of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products and services to the military. Given the onset of the global economic recession in late 2008 and new potential constraints on defence budgets across the world, visiongain revisits the military communications market to ask whether the recent growth trend will be sustainable over the next decade. Is the global military communications market now a market in retreat? This new visiongain defence report - Military Communications & COTS 2009-2019 - discusses those and other important matters in depth.
Visiongain believes that pockets of opportunity within the global military communications market will remain very strong, despite the many constraining economic forces likely to impact upon military budgets during our forecast period to 2019. We believe that exposure to the right procurement programmes will therefore be critical to contractors’ success in the challenging period ahead. We also identify the key areas of opportunity for COTS providers in the airborne, open architecture, UAV, satellite, tactical radio, maritime, embedded and wireless broadband arenas, among others.

Why you should buy this report:

• Global military communications market sales forecasts, 2009-2019

• US military communications market sales forecasts, 2009-2019

• Up-to-date defence sales forecasts for 11 leading military markets: the US, UK, France, Germany, Italy, Canada, Australia, Japan, Russia, China and India (including post 2009-10 fiscal year US defence budget announcement analysis)

• Expert, post-credit crisis opinion from industry specialists in military communications and related sectors, including full interview transcripts from our original survey

• A profile of the major purchasers of COTS military communications equipment and services in these 11 leading military markets

• A profile of 100 major vendors of military communications equipment and services

• An examination of the key drivers and restraints for the global military communications market, including SWOT analysis

• In-depth analysis of the key COTS technologies involved in military communications and our view of their future prospects.

Overview:

The importance of military communications
Today's global military is inseparably bound up with technology, and with communications technology in particular. ‘Military communications’ encompasses a vast array of technologies and submarkets, including radios, satellites, software and embedded computer components.

Communications systems on the battlefield are now rightly regarded as an essential component of mission success. For soldiers on the ground, radios and other communications devices are lifelines. They are needed to summon fire support or seek casualty evacuation, or simply to confirm their location or receive new instructions. For commanders in nearby command posts or headquartered hundreds of miles away, communications are vital for giving orders or simply pinpointing the location of their forces.

Opportunities for providers of milcoms technology
Although providers of products and solutions in this field must be aware that the high cost of platforms, coupled with the global financial crisis, may limit demand in the near future, the market for military communications is also likely to be supported by a number of powerful demand drivers, notably the need for allied information advantages in large-scale, operations such as those in Iraq and Afghanistan.


Key content of the report
This new visiongain report – Military Communications & COTS 2009: A Market in Retreat? - discusses the present and future market for military communications. We critically examine the hypothesis that military communications spending may witness a retreat from the very high growth rates seen this decade.

Order this report today to receive the information you need
Our report analyses the market through a comprehensive review of available information. We provide the information that you need to understand the military communications and COTS market. In addition to relevant sales forecasts, the report highlights important contemporary issues, including the key commercial drivers and restraints of the milcoms market. Sources used include interviews with industry experts, industrial news, policy documents and defence industry research. Visiongain also applies financial forecasting, qualitative analyses and an assessment of currently-unmet needs to provide a comprehensive market-based report with detailed analysis and informed opinion.

Table of Contents:

1 Executive Summary

2 The Military Communications Market and COTS
2.1 Military Communications - an Introduction
2.2 COTS - New Solutions for Traditional Military Demands
2.3 Commercial Communications Technologies for Defence
2.4 Focus and Scope of Military Communications and COTS 2009

3 Key Trends and Issues in COTS
3.1 Key Trends
3.1.1 Communications On-The-Move
3.1.2 Enhanced Communications Essential to Future Systems
3.1.3 Communications Also Essential in Asymmetric Warfare
3.1.4 Present Conflicts Put Pressure on Legacy Communications
3.1.5 Staying the Course in Communications Upgrades
3.2 Key COTS End-User Requirements
3.3 Benefits and Risks of COTS Products to Defence Agencies
3.3.1 Technological Challenges
3.3.2 Security Challenges
3.3.3 Programme Challenges
3.3.4 Perceptual Challenges
3.3.5 Conclusion
3.4 A Note on World Defence Spending

4 Communications Platforms and COTS Solutions
4.1 Origins of COTS: William Perry and the 'Mandate for Change'
4.2 Definition of COTS
4.3 Relevant COTS Technologies
4.3.1 3G
4.3.2 WiMax
4.3.3 Software-Defined Radio (SDR)
4.3.4 Software for Military Communications
4.4 Military and Communications Industry Collaboration
4.4.1 Commercial Design
4.5 Range of Military Application for COTS Solutions
4.5.1 Ground, Mobile
4.5.2 Ground, Fixed
4.5.3 Airborne (Aircraft and UAV-Mounted)
4.5.4 Space (Satellite-Based)
4.5.5 Maritime
4.6 Conclusion

5 Forecasts: US & Global Military Communications
5.1 Summary of Key Visiongain Forecasts
5.2 Global Defence Spending, 2010-2019
5.3 US Defence Spending Powers the Global Market
5.4 US CET&I Spending
5.5 Visiongain Forecast Analysis
5.6 Upside Risks to our Forecasts
5.7 Downside Risks to our Forecasts
5.8 Key Drivers of the Military Communications Market
5.9 Key Constraints on the Military Communications Market
5.10 SWOT Analysis

6 The United States Market
6.1 The United States Market: Overview
6.2 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Programmes in the US
6.2.1 Family of Advanced Beyond Line-of-Sight Terminals
6.2.2 Land Warrior
6.2.3 Navy and Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI)
6.2.4 Global Information Grid
6.2.5 Software Radio: Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS)
6.2.5.1 Waveform Solution
6.2.5.2 Origins
6.2.5.3 Problems and Restructuring
6.2.5.4 COTS Solutions
6.2.5.5 JTRS and Future Combat System (FCS)
6.2.5.6 Radios for Individual Soldiers
6.2.6 WiMax Trials
6.2.7 Tapping 3G
6.2.8 Satellites
6.2.8.1 Mobile User Objective System (MUOS)
6.2.8.2 Transformational Satellite (TSAT)
6.2.8.3 Wideband Global Satcom (WGS)
6.2.9 Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T)
6.3 The US Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

7 The UK Market
7.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in the UK
7.1.1 Bowman
7.1.2 Skynet
7.1.3 Falcon
7.2 The UK Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

8 The French Market
8.1 Status and Direction of Key Projects in France
8.1.1 Syracuse III
8.1.2 Athena
8.1.3 Small Personal Radio in Felin
8.2 The French Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

9 The German Market
9.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in Germany
9.1.1 Tetrapol BW
9.1.2 idZ Infantry of the Future
9.1.3 Project Hercules
9.2 The German Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

10 The Italian Market
10.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Programmes in Italy
10.1.1 Sicral
10.1.2 Soldato Futuro IPR
10.2 The Italian Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

11 The Canadian Market
11.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in Canada
11.1.1 HCTCN Experimental Tactical Radio System
11.1.2 JTRS Involvement
11.1.2.1 CRC Scari
11.1.2.2 Lytech Small Form Factor SDR
11.1.2.3 Spectrum Signal Processing COTS SDR
11.1.2.4 DRDC and SDR Forum
11.1.3 AEHF
11.2 The Canadian Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

12 The Australian Market
12.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in Australia
12.1.1 High Frequency Modernisation Project
12.1.2 Battle Space Communications Land (BSC(L))
12.1.3 Maritime Communications and Information Management Architecture Modernisation
12.2 The Australian Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

13 The Japanese Market
13.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in Japan
13.1.1 Integrated Radio
13.1.2 Regimental Command and Control System (ReCS)
13.2 Use of COTS Components in Japan
13.3 The Japanese Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

14 The Russian Market
14.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communication Projects in Russia
14.1.1 SPM-Atlas (M-539) Cell Phone
14.1.2 Kosmos Satellite
14.2 The Russian Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

15 The People's Republic of China (PRC) Market
15.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in the PRC
15.2 Legacy, Present and Future Use of COTS Communications Components
15.3 The PRC Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

16 The Indian Market
16.1 Status and Direction of Key Military Communications Projects in India
16.1.1 Indian Army Tactical Communications System
16.2 The Indian Market: Analysis and Key Conclusions

17 100 Key Vendors of Military Communications Products and Services
In this chapter, visiongain builds a representative profile of the international military communications market by identifying 100 players worldwide. Our survey reveals a large, dynamic mosaic of providers. Smaller, specialists firms that have developed niche technology and manufacturers of embedded COTS boards and integrated systems sit alongside established multinational titans and household names. We encounter veterans-led businesses, IT firms, telcos and specialists in all major fields of military communications, from 'traditional' communication forms such as radio and antenna manufacturers to satellite companies and SDR leaders.

18 Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.1 United States: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.1.1 Department of Defense (DoD)
18.1.2 Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa)
18.1.2.1 Control-Based Mobile Ad-Hoc Networking (CBMANet)
18.1.2.2 Connectionless Networks (CN)
18.1.2.3 Disruption Tolerant Networks (DTN)
18.1.2.4 Future Combat Systems Communications (FCS-C)
18.1.2.5 Mobile Network (MIMO)
18.1.2.6 Networking in Extreme Environments (Netex)
18.1.2.7 Optical & Radio Frequency (RF) Combined Link Experiment (Orcle)
18.1.2.8 The Next Generation Programme (XG)
18.1.2.9 Ultra-broadband Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation
18.1.2.10 Power Aware Computing and Communication (PAC/C)
18.1.2.11 Analogue Optical Signal Processing (AOSP)
18.1.2.12 Technology for Frequency Agile Digitally Synthesised Transmitters (Tfast)
18.1.2.13 Ultra-Wideband Multifunction Photonic Transmit/Receive Module (Ultra-T/R)
18.1.2.14 Compact Lasers for Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting (CCIT)
17.1.2.15 Ultra Wideband Array Antennas (Uwbaa)
18.1.3 Defence Information Systems Agency (DISA)
18.1.4 Defence Contract Management Agency (DCMA)
18.1.5 Project Manager, Tactical Radio Communications Systems (PM TRCS)
18.1.6 JTRS Joint Programme Executive Office (JPEO)
18.1.7 Milsatcom Joint Programme Office (MJPO)

18.2 United Kingdom: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.2.1 MoD
18.2.2 The Defence Procurement Agency (DPA)
18.2.3 Air Command & Control Systems (ACCS) Integrated Project Team (IPT)
18.2.4 Bowman and Tactical Communications and Information Systems (BATCIS) IPT
18.2.5 Command Support Information Systems (CSIS) IPT
18.2.6 Identification and Communication Equipment (ICE) IPT
18.2.7 Satellite Communications (Satcom) IPT
18.2.8 Strategic Terrestrial Radio Systems (STRS) IPT
18.2.9 Theatre and Formation Communication Systems (TFCS) IPT
18.2.10 Defence Communication Services Agency

18.3 France: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.3.1 MoD
18.3.2 DGA

18.4 Germany: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.4.1 Federal Ministry of Defence (FMoD)
18.4.2 The Federal Office of Defence Technology and Procurement (BWB)
18.4.3 The Federal Office for Information Management and IT of the German Federal Armed Forces (IT AmtBw)

18.5 Italy: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.5.1 Italian MoD
18.5.2 Teledife (Director's Office of Information Science and Advanced Technologies)

18.6 Canada: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.6.1 The Department of National Defence (DND)
18.6.2 Defence R&D Canada (DRDC)
18.6.3 Assistant Defence Minister (Materiel) ADM

18.7 Australia: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.7.1 Department of Defence
18.7.2 The Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO)
18.7.3 The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO)

18.8 Japan: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.8.1 Technical Research and Development Institute (TRDI)
18.8.2 Research Centre Two

18.9 Russia: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.9.1 Ministry of National Defence
18.9.2 Rosoboronexport

18.10 India: Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services
18.10.1 The Ministry of Defence
18.10.2 Department of Defence Production

18.11 PRC: Key Purchasers and Vendors of Military Communications Products and Services
18.11.1 Key Purchasers of Military Communications Products and Services in the PRC
18.11.1.1 Ministry of National Defence
18.11.1.2 Central Military Commission (CMC)
18.11.1.3 Commission on Science, Technology and National Defence Industry (Costind)
18.11.1.4 General Armaments Department (GAD)
18.11.2 Key Vendors of Military Communications Products and Services in the PRC
18.11.2.1 Ministry of Information Industry (MII)
18.11.2.2 China Electronics Technology Group Corp. (CETC)
18.11.2.3 China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC)
18.11.2.4 China Satellite Communications Corporation (ChinaSatcom)
18.11.2.5 Huanyu Mobile Technology Co.
18.11.2.6 Huawei Technologies
18.11.2.7 ZTE Corporation

19 Expert Views
19.1 Dr Sally Baron, Special Advisor to the Defense Commercial Vendors Coalition (DCVC, Washington DC), United States
19.1.1 Need to Streamline US Procurement Process; Bureaucracy Moving Far Too Slowly
19.1.2 DCVC: Companies With Superior Technologies Screaming to be Heard; in High-Tech, Largest Cost is Usually Development
19.1.3 Pentagon Insists On an Optimistic Three-Year Acquisition Cycle That Precludes Best Technologies Getting to the Field
19.1.4 System Has Outlived its Usefulness; Congress Needs to Work With DoD to Streamline Processes
19.1.5 Positive Outlook for COTS Companies; New Generation Will Better Embrace COTS
19.1.6 Identifying a Problem is Not the Same as Fixing it
19.1.7 Troops Must Have the Best Technologies; Our Adversaries are Not Slowed by Bureaucracies
19.1.8 COTS, When Available, Should be Used, 'Unique' Items Becoming Fewer

19.2 Peter Cavill, General Manager, Military & Aerospace, GE Fanuc Intelligent Platforms, UK
19.2.1 Recession Alone Unlikely to See Diminution in Conflict; Technology Moving Forward at Breathtaking Pace
19.2.2 GE Fanuc Investing Heavily in Product Range; Focusing on Primes; Rugged Systems Expertise Valued
19.2.3 Growth Abroad Unlikely to Compensate for Potential Decline in US Defence Spending
19.2.4 Three Key Trends: UAVs, Sensor-Acquired Data and Embedded Training
19.2.5 Significant Further Defence Sector Consolidation Unlikely, at Least Near Term
19.2.6 COTS Opportunity Still an Exciting One; VMEbus, VXS, VPX, CompactPCI
19.2.7 VPX Standard Promises to be Central to Military; New Challenge to Determine Which Processors to Support
19.2.8 Need to Back Technology Winners and Select Right Suppliers
19.2.9 Military Still Winning From COTS

19.3 Kim Walkling, Partner, Simmons & Simmons, London
19.3.1 Affordability and Funding Now Critical Issues in Defence; Strategic Programmes Receiving Support
19.3.2 Consolidation Within the Sector a Possibility; Valuation Will Be a Challenge
19.3.3 EU 'Common Market' for Defence May Be Difficult to Achieve
19.3.4 Critical Programmes Should Still Succeed
19.3.5 Current Trends: Soul Searching; Training Projects Look Firm; Classic PFI/PPP Structure May Not Work on Larger Projects; UAE Showing Strength

20 Report Conclusions
20.1 Summary of Key Forecasts
20.2 Revised General Outlook for Military Communications 2010-2019
20.3 Key Areas of Opportunity for COTS Providers, 2010-2019
20.4 Closing Remarks

List of Tables:

Table 5.1 US Military Communications Market Forecasts, 2010-2019
Table 5.2 Global Military Communications Market Forecasts, 2010-2019
Table 6.1 US Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 7.1 UK Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 8.1 French Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 9.1 German Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 10.1 Italian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 11.1 Canadian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 12.1 Australian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 13.1 Japanese Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 14.1 Russian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 15.1 PRC Defence Spending 2004-2019
Table 16.1 Indian Defence Spending 2004-2019

List of Figures:

Figure 3.1 The World's Top 20 Defence Spenders, 2008
Figure 3.2 The World's Top 5 Defence Spenders, 2008
Figure 5.1 US Military Spending vs the World ($bn)
Figure 5.2 2009 Department of Defense Budget Request
Figure 5.3 US Defence Spending, 2004-2019
Figure 5.4 US CET&I Spending, 2006-2019
Figure 5.5 US Military Communications Market Forecasts, 2010-2019
Figure 5.6 Global Military Communications Forecasts, 2010-2019
Figure 6.1 US Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 6.2 US Defence Spending Historically
Figure 6.3 US Defence Spending Since 2001
Figure 6.4 US Defence Spending as a Percentage of GDP
Figure 7.1 UK Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 8.1 French Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 9.1 German Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 10.1 Italian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 11.1 Canadian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 12.1 Australian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 13.1 Japanese Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 14.1 Russian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 15.1 PRC Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 16.1 Indian Defence Spending 2004-2019
Figure 20.1 Global Military Communications Forecasts, 2010-2019
Figure 20.2 US CET&I Spending, 2006-2019
Figure 20.3 US Military Communications Market Forecasts, 2010-2019

Companies, Organisations and Programmes Mentioned in the Report:

Absolute Analysis (US)
Aculab (US)
Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) Satellite System (Canada)
Advent Communications (US)
Agilent Technologies (US)
Air Command & Control Systems (ACCS) Integrated Project Team (IPT) (UK)
Airbus Group
Aitech Rugged Group Inc (US)
Alcatel Alenia Space (Thales Alenia Space)
Altera (US)
Americom Government Services, Inc. (US)
Analogue Optical Signal Processing (AOSP) (US)
Anritsu Company (US)
Assistant Defence Minister (Materiel) (Canada)
Association of Defence & Security Professional Electronics Industries (France)
Association of French Aerospace Companies (Gifas)
Association of Land Defence Equipment Industries (Gicat) (France)
Association of Naval Construction and Weapons Industries (Gican) (France)
ATDI (UK)
Athena Programme (France)
Atlas Research and Development Centre (Russia)
Australian Defence Force
Australian Industry and Defence Network (AIDN)
Avtec (US)
BAE Systems (US / Multinational)
Battle Space Communications Land (BSC(L)) (Australia)
BelAir Networks (US)
Bernier (France)
Bharat Dynamics Ltd (India)
Bharat Earth Movers Ltd (India)
Bharat Electronics (India)
Bharat Electronics Ltd (India)
Boeing (US / Multinational)
Boeing Australia (Australia)
Boeing Satellite Systems
Bowman (UK)
Bowman and Tactical Communications and Information Systems (BATCIS) IPT (UK)
BT (British Telecom) (UK)
Canada First programme
CC Ploenzke (Germany)
Central Military Commission (CMC) (RC)
Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) (France)
Chief Information Officer Group (CIOG) (Australia)
China Electronics Technology Group Corp (CETC) (PRC)
China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) (PRC)
China Satellite Communications Corporation (ChinaSatcom) (PRC)
Cisco Systems (US / Multinational)
Cobham (UK)
Cogent Defence & Security Networks (UK)
Command Support Information Systems (CSIS) IPT (UK)
Commission on Science, Technology and National Defence Industry (Costind) (PRC)
Communications & Power Industries (US)
Communications et Systèmes (CS) (France)
Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC)
Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center [US Army] (Cerdec)
Compact Lasers for Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting (CCIT) (US)
Computer Sciences Corporation (US)
Connectionless Networks (CN) (US)
Control-Based Mobile Ad-Hoc Networking (CBMANet) (US)
COTS Journal (US)
Curtiss-Wright (US)
Dalnyaya Radiosvyaz Holding Company (Russia)
Data Link Solutions (DLS) (US)
Datamat (Italy)
DataPath (US)
Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) (US)
Defence Communication Services Agency (UK)
Defence Contract Management Agency (DCMA) (US)
Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) (UK)
Defence Fixed Telecommunications System for the MoD (UK)
Defence Industries Council (Cidef) (France)
Defence Information Systems Agency (DISA) (US)
Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) (Australia)
Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC)
Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) (Australia)
Defence Spectrum Strategic Plan (ADSSP)
Defense Commercial Vendors Coalition (US)
Department of Defense (US)
Department of National Defence (DND) (Canada)
Dicon Fiberoptics Inc (US)
Directorate for Cooperation and Industrial Affairs (DGA) (France)
Disruption Tolerant Networks (DTN) (US)
DRS Technologies (US)
E&E Enterprises (US)
EADS (Europe / Multinational)
EADS Astrium (UK)
EADS Deutschland GmbH (Germany)
EADS DS (Germany)
EFJohnson Company (US)
ELCON Systemtechnik (Germany)
ELG (France)
EM Solutions Pty Ltd (Australia)
Emrise Corporation (US)
EMS Technologies (US)
Ericsson (Sweden)
Ericsson Federal Inc. (US)
Falcon (UK)
Family of Advanced Beyond Line-of- Sight Terminals (FAB-T) (US)
Federal Ministry of Defence (FMoD) (Germany)
Federal Office for Information Management and IT of the German Federal Armed Forces (IT AmtBw) (Germany)
Federal Office of Defence Technology and Procurement (Germany)
Felin (France)
Finmeccanica (Italy)
FSB Communications Security Centre (Russia)
Fujitsu (Japan)
Future Combat Systems (US)
Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft (FSTA) project (UK)
Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd (India)
GE Fanuc Intelligent Platforms (US / Japan)
General Armaments Department (GAD) (PRC)
General Dynamics C4 Systems (US)
General Dynamics Canada (Canada)
General Dynamics Decision Systems (UK)
General Dynamics Land Systems (US)
General pour l'Armement (DGA) (France)
Global Information Grid (US)
Goa Shipyard Ltd (India)
Guiana Space Centre
Harris Corp. (US)
Harris Systems (UK)
High Capacity Tactical Communications Network (HCTCN) (Canada)
High Frequency Modernisation Project (Australia)
Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (India)
Huanyu Mobile Technology Co. (PRC)
Huawei Technologies (PRC)
Hughes (US)
IBM (US / Multinational)
Identification and Communication Equipment (ICE) IPT (UK)
Indian Army Tactical Communications System
Intelsat General Corporation (US)
Inter-Digital (US)
International Communications Group (US)
Italian MoD
ITT Communications Systems (US)
JSC (Joint-Stock Company) Relero (Russia)
JTRS Joint Programme Executive Office (JPEO) (US)
Kaiser Electro-Optics Inc
Kosmos Satellite (Russia)
L-3 Communications (US)
Land Warrior (US)
Lockheed Martin (US)
Luneberg Antennas (France)
Maritime Communications and Information Management Architecture Modernisation (Australia)
Mayflower Communications (US)
Mazagon Dock Ltd (India)
Mercury Computer Systems (MCS) (US)
Milsatcom Joint Programme Office (MJPO) (US)
Ministry of Defence (India)
Ministry of Defence (UK)
Ministry of Information Industry (MII) (PRC)
Ministry of National Defence (Russia)
Mishra Dhatu Nigam Ltd (India)
Mobilcom (Germany)
Mobile Network (MIMO) (US)
Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) (US)
Modernised High Frequency Communications System (MHFCS) (Australia)
Motorola (US)
National Command Authority (US)
Nato
Navy and Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) (US)
NEC (Japan)
Networking in Extreme Environments (Netex) (US)
Nokia (Finland / Multinational)
Northrop Grumman (US)
Omega Training Group
Optical & Radio Frequency (RF) Combined Link Experiment (Orcle) (US)
Pacific Star Communication (PacStar) (US)
Paradigm Secure Communications (UK)
People's Liberation Army (PLA)
Power Aware Computing and Communication (PAC/C) (US)
PrismTech Solutions Americas (US)
Proactive Communications Inc (US)
Project Hercules
Project Manager, Tactical Radio Communications Systems (PM TRCS) (US)
QinetiQ (UK)
Quintech Electronics (US)
Racal Acoustics (UK)
Radio Frequency Systems Program Office (Australia)
Raytheon (US)
Regimental Command and Control System (ReCS) (Japan)
Richelieu Committee (France)
Rivulet Communications (US)
Rockwell Collins (US)
Rosoboronexport (Russia)
Royal Australian Navy (RAN)
SAAB Defence, Aviation & Space (Sweden / Multinational)
Saft (Germany)
Sagem Défense Sécurité (France)
SAIC (US / Multinational)
Samsung (Korea / Multinational)
Satellite Communications (Satcom) IPT (UK)
Satellite, Radio-Relay and Tropospheric Communication (STARS) Consortium (Russia)
Secure Communication Systems (US)
Segovia (US)
Selenia Communications (Italy)
Selex Communications (Italy)
Senate Armed Services Committee (US)
Short Term Strategic Air-Lift (STSA)
Sicral (Italy)
Siemens (Germany)
Simmons & Simmons (UK)
Sitab consortium (Italy)
Skynet (UK)
Spectrum Signal Processing (Canada)
Spectrum Signal Processing (Canada)
State Council Information Office of China
Strategic Terrestrial Radio Systems (STRS) IPT (UK)
Stratos (UK)
Syracuse III (France)
Tactical Air Control Party Modernization (TACP-M) programme (US)
Tactical Radio System (US)
Tadiran Communications (US)
Tata Group (India
Technical Research and Development Institute (TRDI) (Japan)
Technology for Frequency Agile Digitally Synthesised Transmitters (Tfast) (US)
Teledife (Director's Office of Information Science and Advanced Technologies) (Italy)
Telespazio (Italy)
Tenix Defence (Australia)
Thales (France)
Thales Alenia Space (France)
Thales Australia
Thales Communications (US)
The Next Generation Programme (XG) (US)
Theatre and Formation Communication Systems (TFCS) IPT (UK)
Transformational Satellite (TSAT)
T-Systems (Germany)
Ultra Electronics (Canada)
Ultra Wideband Array Antennas (Uwbaa) (US)
Ultra-broadband Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation (US)
Ultra-Wideband Multifunction Photonic Transmit/Receive Module (Ultra-T/R) (US)
United Kingdom Military Flying Training System (UKMFTS)
ViaSat (US)
VMETRO (Norway)
Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) (US)
Wideband Gapfiller Satellite (US)
Wideband Global Satcom (WGS)
ZTE Corporation (PRC

 

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